Flowers


You were never going to see me Among all the other flowers, Watching idle as the strangers Daily passed me by. I am not unlike my sisters, Neither am I just like them; We are gathered as a body Staring at the sky. If you deign to come in closer And, for once, get on … Continue reading Flowers

Stars


Did you see the stars tonight? I could hear them cry Watching human promises, Every one a lie. The stars above, among themselves, Feel no need to compete. Each is glad for her own light, Sacred and complete. One by one they turn away, Collapsing in despair: Their grief consuming everything, Leaving their wrath fair. … Continue reading Stars

The Captain’s Daughter by Jennifer Delamere + Author Q&A!


I enjoy it when historical fiction books are written in different settings. So many seem to take place during the Season or inside of country houses. Though these books are enjoyable, a different setting ensures that I will remember the story. The Captain's Daughter by Jennifer Delamere provided a new setting. A good deal of … Continue reading The Captain’s Daughter by Jennifer Delamere + Author Q&A!

The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens


After one month in its pages, I have finished The Pickwick Papers. It is part of my 2019 Classic Novel Challenge, one of the longer ones on the list. I'm unable to critique writing by my favorite author. How can I nitpick the gripping prose, the humorous twists and turns, the delightful poetry? I cannot … Continue reading The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens

Netherwood by Jane Sanderson


Netherwood was a side read to space out my 2019 Classic Novel Challenge. Like The Lady and the Gent, it is historical fiction. Though they share a genre, these novels are delightful in their own ways. Netherwood is more sober than The Lady and the Gent. It’s the story of a widow named Eve and … Continue reading Netherwood by Jane Sanderson

The Lady and the Gent by Rebecca Connolly


Last week, I took a break from my strict 2019 Reading Challenge and searched for some historical fiction to provide a quick, happy read. Three books by Rebecca Connolly caught my eye, and in two days I had finished the first, The Lady and the Gent. The book did not disappoint; I was smiling by the time … Continue reading The Lady and the Gent by Rebecca Connolly

Russian Magic Tales from Pushkin to Platonov by Robert Chandler


My third book in this year’s classic novel challenge, Russian Magic Tales, was a delight. I wandered dark forests, met evil stepmothers, learned riddles, and—happily—found the Russian mermaid, who draws travelers to death with her weeping. More interesting than the stories were the biographies of each featured author. Many lived dank lives, suffering illness and … Continue reading Russian Magic Tales from Pushkin to Platonov by Robert Chandler

The Story of King Arthur and His Knights by Howard Pyle


The second book in my 2019 classic novel challenge was The Story of King Arthur and His Knights. These stories were released in serial form for a children’s publication; they are characterized by their bold protagonists, as well as their focus on virtue and morality. It is not a novel, but a compilation of tales … Continue reading The Story of King Arthur and His Knights by Howard Pyle

The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy


The first book I read for my 2019 reading challenge, The Mayor of Casterbridge, is compelling because of its characters. Though there are many, it focuses on a man named Michael Henchard, a man none of us would envy. It is the story of a mistake he made as a young man and how this mistake … Continue reading The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy

The 2019 Reading List


In this post, I spoke about my New Year's Resolution: to read 30 classic novels—or at least attempt to read them—in order to work through my bookshelf. Collecting books is a beautiful thing, but that's only half the fun; the magic is in reading them! I said I would post my reading list when it … Continue reading The 2019 Reading List

Around the Literary World in a Year


A new year always brings with it pressure to come up with a resolution. Though setting goals often feels like a trend, I don't like ignoring a clean slate. I don't plan to do anything mind-blowing this year, but I know where I hope to be when roaring 2020 comes in. Writing-wise, 2019 will see … Continue reading Around the Literary World in a Year